Sit for Success

businesswoman sitting in the office chair88 percent of small business owners admit that seating has a DIRECT EFFECT on employee productivity.

If you’re looking for a way to improve your work, look no further than the seat you do it in. The wrong seat can cause short-term damage to productivity and inspiration, not to mention long-term damage to our physique.

If you’re looking for a way to improve your work, look no further than the seat you do it in. The wrong seat can cause short-term damage to productivity and inspiration, not to mention long-term damage to our physique.

Bum side-effects

A 2014 study by Nielsen noted that 88 percent of small business owners admit that seating has a direct effect on employee productivity. Eighty percent of employees report feelings of tingling and numbness in their hands due to uncomfortable seats, and other studies have shown that poor posture, back aches and weak circulation can all result from inadequate seat support.

Despite general awareness of the problem, 44 percent of workers cannot remember the last time they received a new chair. If you’re struggling to stay focused and comfortable in the seat you’ve been given, consider requesting an upgrade. If you’re denied (despite all those convincing statistics we’ve provided above!), do yourself a favor by alternating between sitting and standing, and stretch periodically at your desk.

How to treat your seat

If there’s room for new seats in the budget, request these two qualities recommended by ergonomic experts. First, the chair should be adjustable in height so that any person (in any shoe) can keep their feet flat on the floor. Second, the backrest should maintain contact with the sitter’s upper and lower back in any posture, requiring the seat to slide forward when the backrest is reclined.

Office chairs generally come with guarantees, which you can expect their life to exceed by a two to three years. Keep track of how long your seat remains unchanged, and when it’s time to upgrade, make it a priority. After all, most workers sit in their chairs for more than six hours a day – that could mean 1,664 hours of discomfort ever year!

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